2014

KATY BREWER

ALEX HELMAN

JOSHUA MITCHELL (BS Chemistry, University of Louisville)

Awards and Honors

  • ‘Honors’ in several medical school classes: Microscopic Anatomy, Human Embryology, Neurosciences, Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Clinical Neurosciences, Cancer Immunology, Special Topics: Biochemistry Research. Honors are awarded to students in the 90th percentile or greater and to students with over a 90% in the class (2012-14).
  • Course representative for Genetics and Molecular Medicine during medical school. As course representative, I acted as a liaison between the student body and the course director and professors. This included working out scheduling conflicts and disputing questions on exams (Spring 2013). 
  • 2nd Place Cancer Research Presentation Award Undergraduate Student Category for the “Computational Tools for the Identification of Detectable Uncharacterized Derivatized Metabolites within the Context of Known Metabolites” poster presented at Research Louisville (2012).
  • Recipient of the Hypercube Award, given to the graduating senior in the chemistry department with the highest GPA (2012).
  • Member of the three person team that won “Outstanding Winner”, one of the five teams with this rating internationally for the problem in discrete mathematics, in the 2012 Mathematical Competition in Modeling (MCM) Problem B for our paper “C.A.R.S.: Cellular Automaton Rafting Simulation”. The MCM is an annual, international mathematical modeling competition with over 3500 participating teams. My job on the project focused on writing the computer code for our model within the 72-hour deadline. This model was implemented in Perl and used multi-processing (2012).
  • Member of the team that received the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics Prize for the before mentioned “C.A.R.S.: Cellular Automaton Rafting Simulation” paper. The SIAM prize is awarded annually to one outstanding MCM team (2012).
  • Participant in the R25 NIH/NCI Cancer Education Program (R25-CA134283) under the direction of Dr.  David Hein. This program included education in research ethics and scientific writing (2012).
  • Grawemeyer Scholar at the University of Louisville (2008-2012).
  • Participant in the Guaranteed Entrance to Medical School (GEMS) program. This program takes up to ten graduating seniors each year and allows participants to shadow in a variety of clinical settings during undergrad (2008-2012).

Poster Presentations:

  •          Joshua Mitchell and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2014) “Development of Large-Scale Metabolite Identification Methods for Metabolomics”. Poster presented at Bluegrass Biophysics Symposium, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
  •          Joshua Mitchell and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2014) “Development of Large-Scale Metabolite Identification Methods for Metabolomics”. Poster presented at Markey Cancer Research Day, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
  •          Joshua Mitchell and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2013) “Computational Tools for the Identification of Detectable Uncharacterized Derivatized Metabolites within the Context of Known Metabolites”. Poster presented at James Graham Brown Cancer Center 11th Annual Retreat, Louisville, Ky.­­
  •        Joshua Mitchell and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2013) “Computational Tools for the Identification of Detectable Uncharacterized Derivatized Metabolites within the Context of Known Metabolites”. Poster presented at UT-ORNL-KBRIN Bioinformatics Summit, Buchanan, TN.
  •        Joshua Mitchell and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2012) “Computational Tools for the Identification of Detectable Uncharacterized Derivatized Metabolites within the Context of Known Metabolites”. Poster presented at Research Louisville, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.
  •          Joshua Mitchell, James Jones and Suraj Kannan (2012) “C.A.R.S.: Cellular Automaton Rafting Simulation”. Paper presented at the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
  •          Joshua Mitchell and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2012) “Developing Computational Tools for Metabolite Identification in Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data”. Poster presented at University of Louisville Undergraduate Research Symposium, Louisville, Kentucky.
  •          Joshua Mitchell and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2012) “Developing Computational Tools for Metabolite Identification in Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data”. Poster presented at UT-ORNL-KBRIN Bioinformatics Summit, Louisville, Kentucky.
  •          Joshua Mitchell, Rima R. Patel, Rodney Folz Jr, Andrew McCullam and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2011) “Developing Computational Tools for Molecular Comparison and Metabolic Placement of Detectable Uncharacterized Metabolites”. James Graham Brown Cancer Center 10th Annual Retreat, Louisville, Kentucky.
  •          Joshua Mitchell, Rima R. Patel and Hunter N.B. Moseley (2011) “Developing Computational Tools for Metabolite Molecular Comparison and Search”. Poster presented at Posters-at-the-Capitol in Frankfort, Ky.

Publications

  •  Jones, J., Kannan, S., and Mitchell, J. (2013). Dynamic scheduling of white water rafting. Harvard College Mathematics Review 6, 96-112.
  • Mitchell, J.M., Fan, T.W., Lane, A.N., and Moseley, H.N. (2014). Development and in silico evaluation of large-scale metabolite identification methods using functional group detection for metabolomics. Frontiers in genetics 5, 237.

 

PAYTON STEVENS (BS Biology, University of Kentucky)

Publications

  • Larson, Y., Liu, J., Stevens, P.D., Li, X., Li, J., Evers, B.M., and Gao, T. (2010). Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) regulates cell migration and polarity through activation of CDC42 and RAC1. J Biol Chem 285, 24987-24998.
  • Gulhati, P., Bowen, K.A., Liu, J., Stevens, P.D., Rychahou, P.G., Chen, M., Lee, E.Y., Weiss, H.L., O'Connor, K.L., Gao, T., et al. (2011). mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate EMT, motility, and metastasis of colorectal cancer via RhoA and Rac1 signaling pathways. Cancer Res 71, 3246-3256.
  • Liu, J., Stevens, P.D., and Gao, T. (2011). mTOR-dependent regulation of PHLPP expression controls the rapamycin sensitivity in cancer cells. J Biol Chem 286, 6510-6520.
  • Liu, J., Stevens, P.D., Li, X., Schmidt, M.D., and Gao, T. (2011). PHLPP-mediated dephosphorylation of S6K1 inhibits protein translation and cell growth. Molecular and cellular biology 31, 4917-4927.
  • Gulhati, P., Zaytseva, Y.Y., Valentino, J.D., Stevens, P.D., Kim, J.T., Sasazuki, T., Shirasawa, S., Lee, E.Y., Weiss, H.L., Dong, J., et al. (2012). Sorafenib enhances the therapeutic efficacy of rapamycin in colorectal cancers harboring oncogenic KRAS and PIK3CA. Carcinogenesis 33, 1782-1790.
  • Li, X., Stevens, P.D., Yang, H., Gulhati, P., Wang, W., Evers, B.M., and Gao, T. (2013). The deubiquitination enzyme USP46 functions as a tumor suppressor by controlling PHLPP-dependent attenuation of Akt signaling in colon cancer. Oncogene 32, 471-478.
  • Liu, J., Stevens, P.D., Eshleman, N.E., and Gao, T. (2013). Protein phosphatase PPM1G regulates protein translation and cell growth by dephosphorylating 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). J Biol Chem 288, 23225-23233.
  • Wen, Y.A., Stevens, P.D., Gasser, M.L., Andrei, R., and Gao, T. (2013). Downregulation of PHLPP expression contributes to hypoxia-induced resistance to chemotherapy in colon cancer cells. Molecular and cellular biology 33, 4594-4605.
  • Li, X., Stevens, P.D., Liu, J., Yang, H., Wang, W., Wang, C., Zeng, Z., Schmidt, M.D., Yang, M., Lee, E.Y., et al. (2014). PHLPP is a negative regulator of RAF1, which reduces colorectal cancer cell motility and prevents tumor progression in mice. Gastroenterology 146, 1301-1312 e1301-1310.