Recent News

Women in Medicine and Science Hold Annual Visiting Professor Program

Posted: 11/3/2016

Women in Medicine and Science (WIMS) at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine will hold its second annual Visiting Professor Program on Thursday, Nov. 3 at UK Albert B. Chandler Hospital, Pavilion A. Dr. Claire Pomeroy is the featured speaker.

“A Day with Claire Pomeroy” will begin at 7 a.m. with a continental breakfast. Symposium I, “Creating a Healthier World by Addressing Social Determinants of Health,” will begin at 7:30 a.m. During the rest of the morning, there will be two breakout sessions: “Diversity and Inclusivity, Unconscious Bias” and “Your Digital Presence.”

Symposium II, “Women and Medicine in Science: Building an Inclusive Culture,” will begin at Noon. The afternoon breakout sessions will focus on: “How to Give and Receive Back” and “Negotiating on the Job.”

The Symposia are open to the entire medical community. The breakout sessions are open to the WIMS membership.

Pomeroy is president of the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation. She serves as chief executive officer of the Foundation and is responsible for advancing the Foundation's mission to "improve health by accelerating support for medical research through recognition of research excellence, public education and advocacy.”

An expert in... FULL STORY

Tags: Women in Medicine
 

UK Researcher Leads International Epilepsy Cure Initiative

Posted: 8/1/2016
University of Kentucky College of Medicine Professor Matthew Gentry will direct a team international scientists recently awarded a five-year, $8.5 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to pursue a cure for Lafora’s disease. The International Epilepsy Cure Center based at the UK College of Medicine’s Department of Molecular Medicine and... FULL STORY
Tags: Research, Biochemistry,  Epilepsy
 

UK Virologist Becky Dutch Explores the Varying Nature of Viruses

Posted: 2/23/2016
From Zika to Ebola, the emerging viruses of the 21st century pose a threat to populations throughout the world as silent invaders of the human body. While viruses infect most people multiple times a year with varying degrees of severity and symptoms, no two viruses function in exactly the same way.For University of Kentucky virologist Becky Dutch... FULL STORY
Tags: Biochemistry, Research
 

Dutch named American Society of Virology President-Elect

Posted: 10/5/2015 - Tags: Faculty, Awards and Recognition, Biochemistry
University of Kentucky College of Medicine Professor Rebecca Dutch has been named President-Elect for the American Society for Virology (ASV). The American Society of Virology, comprised of over 3,000 members from around the globe, was founded in 1981 to provide a forum for discussion and collaboration for investigators of human, animal, insect, plant, fungal and bacterial viruses. ASV sponsors a large annual meeting, promotes communication about virology research to the broader community, and represents virologists on national and international scientific councils. Dutch will serve as the ASV president-elect for 2015-2016 and ASV president from 2016-2017. Dutch... FULL STORY

Muscular Dystrophy Association Funds ALS Research at UK

Posted: 9/16/2015 - Tags: Research, Biochemistry, ALS
The Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) awarded Haining Zhu, a professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, a three-year, $300,000 grant to study the underlying mechanisms of ALS. In an effort to accelerate treatments and cures for neuromuscular diseases, the MDA distributed $10 million in grants this summer to scientists conducting significant research on muscular dystrophy, ALS and other muscle-debilitating diseases. Zhu’s research seeks to understand the mutations of the Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) gene, which is a known cause of ALS. He was one of 36 international researchers — and the only researcher in Kentucky —... FULL STORY

UK Researcher Awarded Grant to Study Link Between Obesity and Cancer

Posted: 8/13/2015 - Tags: Research, Obesity associated complications, National Cancer Institute
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recently awarded a $750,000 grant to University of Kentucky researcher Fredrick Onono to study the potential link between obesity and breast cancer. Obese women are four times more likely to develop treatment-resistant breast cancer, but the exact mechanism for this observation is still largely a mystery. The link between high-fat diets and cancer development provides a clue that fats themselves may somehow be responsible for causing cells to malfunction. Onono, who recently became an assistant professor at the University of Kentucky, will work with fellow UK researchers Andrew Morris, Ashwini Anand Professor of Cardiology; Dr... FULL STORY

UK Board Approves Four University Research Professorships

Posted: 5/9/2015 - Tags: Biochemistry, Faculty
The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees today approved University Research Professorships for 2015-16 for four faculty members. The professorships carry a $40,000 award to support research. Funds for these annual awards are provided by the Office of the Vice President for Research. Now in its 39th year, the University Research Professors program's purpose is to enhance and encourage scholarly research productivity, to provide an opportunity for concentrated research effort for selected faculty members, and to recognize outstanding research achievement by members of the faculty. The 2015-16 University Research Professors are: Lance E. De Long, a professor... FULL STORY

Markey, LLS Host Fourth Annual 'Meet the Researchers Day'

Posted: 5/4/2015 - Tags: Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
The University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society hosted their fourth annual "Meet the Researchers Day" last Thursday. Meet the Researchers Day is a field trip given as a prize to two schools in the region who successfully raise more than $1,000 for the LLS's Pennies for Patients campaign. This year, students from Bondurant Middle School (BMS) in Frankfort, Ky., and Shelby County West Middle School (SCWMS) in Shelbyville, Ky., won the opportunity to visit the Biomedical/Biological Sciences Research Building (BBSRB) on UK's campus and learned more about how the money they raised for Pennies for Patients will help further cancer... FULL STORY

Study Translates Genetic Risk Factor into Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention

Posted: 4/2/2015 - Tags: UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Aging, Alzheimer's disease
What if a failed leukemia drug could reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease? A team at the University of Kentucky recently led an effort to investigate this hypothesis. Their results were published today in the journal, Human Molecular Genetics. The UK researchers, led by Steve Estus at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, study a genetic variant in a gene called CD33 that reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The Estus group recently published findings suggesting that this variant promotes production of a truncated form of the CD33 protein that lacks a putative functional domain. The CD33 protein is present on microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain. CD33... FULL STORY

New UK Research Facility Gets Green Light From State Legislature

Posted: 3/4/2015
University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto believes it is time "to make death a beggar in Kentucky.” It’s the idea that through world-class research across an array of disciplines, and a commitment to working as partners with communities across the state, some of the most stubborn health challenges and statistics that plague Kentucky can be successfully attacked. On Tuesday, the state General Assembly and Gov. Steve Beshear demonstrated their unwavering commitment to that vision of addressing Kentucky’s most stubborn health disparities by endorsing funding for construction of a $265 million, multidisciplinary research building at UK. The Senate voted 36-... FULL STORY

UK Researchers Solve Metabolic Mystery Lending Insight Into Lafora Disease

Posted: 1/26/2015 - Tags: Biochemistry
Scientists at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine have determined how an enzyme essential for energy metabolism functions, solving a mystery eluding molecular biologists for decades. Matthew Gentry, Ph.D, and Craig Vander Kooi, Ph.D, associate professors of molecular and cellular biochemistry, and researcher Madushi Raththagala, Ph.D, recently discovered the role of the enzyme laforin in modifying human glycogen and thereby preventing neurodegeneration. Their work provides fundamental insights that link energy metabolism with the fatal, neurodegenerative form of epilepsy called Lafora disease. These findings were reported Jan. 22, 2015, in the journal,... FULL STORY

UK Researcher Explores Gene's Role in Blood Clotting

Posted: 9/19/2014 - Tags: Biochemistry, Von Willebrand Factor
Two independent groups of researchers led by Sidney "Wally" Whiteheart, PhD, at the University of Kentucky, and Dr. Charles Lowenstein, at the University of Rochester, have published important studies exploring the role that a gene called STXBP5 plays in the development of cardiovascular disease. According to Whiteheart, previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified a gene called STXBP5 as a factor that regulates a protein called Von Willebrand factor (VWF). VWF is an important contributor to normal blood clotting. When the endothelial cells that line a blood vessel are injured, VWF is released into the bloodstream, where it "collects" blood... FULL STORY

Meyer-van der Westhuyzen Study of Oxidized LDL Shows Early Promise For

Posted: 9/4/2014 - Tags: Lipid Research, Saha Cardiovascular Research Center
A team of investigators has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions. Jason Meyer, a University of Kentucky M.D.-Ph.D. candidate, worked with Deneys van der Westhuyzen, a professor in the departments of Internal Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, to study the role oxidized LDL plays in the development of plaque inside artery walls. According to Meyer, the medical research community has traditionally believed that oxidized LDL plays a pivotal role in that process. "Oxidized LDL moves rapidly into arterial walls and engorges them... FULL STORY

COBRE Receives NIH Funding for Final Phase of Junior Faculty Research

Posted: 9/2/2014 - Tags: Grants and Funding, COBRE, Biochemistry
The University of Kentucky's Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) on the Molecular Basis of Human Disease was recently awarded a third phase of National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding for a program to develop its research community and center dedicated to human disease. With this new $1.25 million annual grant, UK's COBRE will build upon achievements of a research development program that initially received NIH support in 2004. During the past 10 years, the program has fostered the research endeavors of junior faculty, providing mentorship, resources, pilot projects and facilities to enhance translational studies on major health issues within the... FULL STORY

Following a Scientific Trail

Posted: 8/12/2014 - Tags: Biochemistry
University of Kentucky associate professor Dr. Matthew Gentry, a biochemist who studies the very basic makeup of living things, can count very few "Eureka!" moments in his scientific career. One of those moments occurred while he was studying the genetic mutation associated with Lafora's disease, a type of epilepsy that inevitably causes death from neurodegeneration early in life. He was conducting post-doctoral research at University of California-San Diego to determine what happens within the cells of children born with Lafora's disease. He was examining the role of the protein laforin, the mutation that causes the disease. He and a colleague performed a series of... FULL STORY